White kid in Swaziland

February 23, 2010

I grew up in the southern part of a small country called Swaziland. It has less than a million people living in it, and most on them living in the north. My father was a pastor in a black congregation there. The people of Swaziland are poor, as is general for the most of Africa. We lived in a 600m2 house owned by the church, across the street my father’s black collegue was living in a much smaller house with his family.

I have many good memories from this place. Typical child stuff – playing, climbing trees, riding bicycle. But I also remember the black congregations in which my father was working. I remember the singing, and even today still remember some of the songs, and recognize them in black congretions in Mamelodi when I visit. I remember the ways in which they collected the meagre amount of money on a Sunday, with singing and dancing.

But I never had black friends in Swaziland. Well, apparently I had as a very small kid according to my parents, but I can’t remember them. My friends were white. Blacks were the other. They played by themselves. We played by ourselves. When we had birthday parties, it was the white kids from the small white community in South Africa, and the white kids that we went to school with in Piet Retief, the white town on the other side of the border.

I do remember some of the black collegues my father had, with some of them I can remember not really noticing colour. Not caring to be touched by them. Easily talking to them. Especially Baba Gama, who always checked to see if I could recognize his voice when he was calling and I would answer. I remember black people sharing the table with us at our home, and we with them at conferences. I had much of the inter-culture experience that kids of missionaries have. I treasure that.

But I know this: the black people living across the street, the black people in town, even the black congregants, I weren’t looking at them as equals. I don’t know if I were racist at this stage of my life, but I definitely had a sense than the black people among whom I were living weren’t “on the same level”.

4 Responses to “White kid in Swaziland”

  1. idelette Says:

    Thank you for sharing, Cobus.


  2. Well, we tried our best, even be enrolling you in a predominantly Swazi preschool, but you didn’t want to play with the Swazi children, because they didn’t speak your language!😉 And you did play with Thandeka (Babe Gama’s daughter) and we hoped that you would learn siSwati. But after a short while she started speaking Afrikaans!


  3. […] sanksies. Dit was die 80′s. Ek was nie hier nie. Ek’s in ’84 gebore, en het in Swaziland gebly. Bietjie kleuterskool gehad, maar die wit laerskool was nog oppad. Op 4 of 5 kan mens seker nog […]


  4. […] opgegroeid als blanke jongen in Swaziland […]


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