After having a birthday party till after 2 o’clock this morning, great conversations, great people, I got up at 8:50 to be at Greenfield at 9:30 for a meetup of Tswane Christian Bloggers. The following bloggers (and others) attended:

Steve Hays, Roger Saner, Cori Wielenga, her husband Kevin Parry (an atheist blogger), Ronald van den Bergh, Joe Reed, myself and Chris, a guy visiting Nieucommunities at the moment.

We had the standard exchane of blogging tips, with Roger basically explaining some of the technical things to us, had quite a lot of conversations about David Bosch, and a long conversation about fundamentalism (and this is just those I can think of now and that I followed, because at most given stages there was at least two conversation going on).

Oh the endless question of fundamentalism! The idea that I alone are right, but not only that, that everyone differing from me on certain key points (whatever that might be), must be evil. One interesting thing is the agreement we had, including Kevin, that you also find fundamentalism in atheism. Now, this is not a new discovery, but maybe just something realised more and more.

I’m reading Matthew with my grade 7 Sunday school class, we started yesterday. We will draw up a timeline of the words and deeds of Jesus in Matthew. At one point yesterday I just put some basics on the table: What is a gospel? How is the Bible devided? How many gospels are there? Do they agree on everything? Why do they differ? And without even thinking a number of the kids told me that they obviously differ because they were written by different people, and different things was important to them. Now, obviously this does on encompass the full complexity of the synoptic problem, but it does show that in kids there is comfort with of a view which is not fundamentalistic.

But OK, meetup was great! We should really do this more often.

It’s quite a hectic time at the moment. Will be preaching twice on Sunday (all my respect to those of you who have to do this every week), and since we are busy with a series where similar sermons are preached in both our services, I have to finish my one sermon by tomorrow to send it to the other guy that will be preaching. What’s worse is that he has been a pastor for 40 years or something, and I just started out, so it’s kind of a stressful idea!!!

What’s more I’ll be having a meeting tomorrow about this years Engineering Ethics, a course at the university where I’m part of the team teaching and facilitating discussions. So the lecturer asked if I’d bring along my ideas for possible work we could add/change to/in the curriculum, especially with regards to Ecological Ethics, which we would like to give higher priority this year. I’m thinking about the first chapter of Fritjof Capra’s The Web of Life, but it contains a lot of philosophy which I’m not sure what the Engineering students will make of. So, if you have any ideas which might help, and you can let me know within the next 12 hours, I’ll appreciate it. I’m looking for something scholarly, something radical, something ecological, and something the lay reader can understand (The average engineer isn’t that interested in philosophy or ethics).

OK, a question. What’s the relationship between discipleship and the church? I’ll be preaching on discipleship and biblical formation on Sunday (again, I have about 18 hours to finish my draft on this sermon), and as I was working this afternoon, some questions arised.

Discipleship is not coming to church, but it’s going into the world. What do we do when we go into the world? Where is the world? Is the church part of the world? Sometimes I wonder why even keep the church? Well, it seems like the task of the church would be to prepare people for discipleship; I get this mainly from Matt 28 (read the thoughts of David Bosch in Transforming Mission on this), go and teach what you have learned from Jesus; Jesus made disciples, now go and make some more, to make more, to make more? No, to do what Matthew wrote in his account of Jesus from chap 1-28, to take part in the Kingdom of God, the Kingdom of Heaven, to heal, bring hope, feed to poor, look after the vulnerable etc etc. Why have another sermon on this? What do I say when I have another sermon on this? Can the church actually “train” people in discipleship? Is biblical formation and discipleship the same thing? Is discipleship and making disciples the same thing? Maybe biblical formation and disciples, or making disciples is supposed to be the same thing, but do we use this terminology for the same thing in our churches?

I’m reading Emerging Churches by Gibbs/Bolger, especially chapters 3 and 4, as part of my preparation. Is this the answer? Should we close down church and start alternative communities? What about the millions in traditional congregations who will never fit into new models, are they “lost for discipleship”? Is discipleship possible in a traditional Reformed congregation? What about in a hip mega-church? Bring back the question, in what way is discipleship (or making disciples ) and church linked at all?

Well OK, have to go now, I’m having dinner with some nice people from the congregation. A technical error (I’m sure the database we are using has some programming error) caused me to phone the wrong person to sympathise with a husbands death. As Murphy would have it, this person had a brother with the same name as the dead husband, and I left a message just to say that I heard, and would call later. She got it, thought her brother died, then found out he was alive bla bla bla. You can imagine the bad experience it must have been! I felt very bad. So actually I just wanted to go and say sorry, but, in spite of my horrible mistake, the nice people are giving me some food (which is great if you are in bachelorhood!)